Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement.

A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube,” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume.
B. A solid figure which can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units.

Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement.

A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube,” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume.

B. A solid figure which can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units.
Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement.

A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube,” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume.

B. A solid figure which can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units.
Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement.

A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube,” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume.

B. A solid figure which can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units.
Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement.

A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube,” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume.

B. A solid figure which can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units.

Increasing Rigor

  • Why are the units in volume “cubed”?
  • What are two situations in which you would want to know the volume of something?
  • How are area and volume alike and different?
  • How many different ways can you pack twelve brownies, all the same size, to fit into a box?
  • A box has the dimensions of 5 cm x 2 cm x 4 cm. Can you create a box with different dimensions but that holds the same number of cubic centimeters (volume)?
  • I packed 24 centimeter cubes inside of a container. What might the dimensions of the container be? What are other possible dimensions?
  • Draw two solid figures that each have a volume of 25 cubic units.

About the Math

Essential vocabulary for this standard includes: volume, unit, cube, and cubic units (online dictionary, visual math dictionary).
The Illustrative Mathematics task below demonstrates expectation for this standard.

Rich Tasks for Multiple Means of Engagement, Expression, and Representation (UDL)


VDW3-5.pngTeaching Student-Centered Mathematics (Grades 3-5)


pg. 285 - *Figure 9.25 and paragraph 2

Learnzillion Video Resources (6 Lessons with 5.MD.4)

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Select image for lesson set.



Additional Lesson Sets from Learnzillion:
Print Resources:
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Brain-Compatible Activities
for Mathematics 4-5 (107-109)

Hands-On Standards (Grades 5-6), Page 144,
Volume of a Rectangular Solid

Web Resources:

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lessons.jpg
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Games and Centers
Lessons
Student Resources
Video Segments
IXL: Volume of Rectangular Prisms Made of Unit Cubes
Engage NY- 3 Lessons (5.MD.3, 5.MD.4)

Learnzillion Youtube Playlist (7 volume videos)
Counting Cubes
Build a Cubic Meter (Lesson Seed)

Identify the difference between a square unit and a cubic unit (4:39)

Exploring Volume (Lesson Seed)

Understand Volume, Measure Volume, Relate Volume to Addition and Subtraction

Building Rectangular Prisms (Lesson Seed)







Determining Volume (MSDE Lesson)



Understanding Concepts of Volume
(MSDE Lesson Seed)



Fish Tank Volume



Box of Clay



Cubism (5.MD.3 & 5.MD.4)



How Many Cubes? (5.MD.3 & 5.MD.4)



Discovering Volume



Geometry Scavanger Hunt







Questions/Comments:

Contact John SanGiovanni at jsangiovanni@hcpss.org.

Creative_Commons.pngUse and Sharing of HCPSS Website and Resources
Howard County Public Schools Office of Elementary Mathematics Curricular Projects has licensed this product under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.IXL: Volume of Rectangular Prisims made of Unit Cubes